Monday, April 03, 2017

Two Magicians Walk into a Bar…



So two magicians walk into a bar, a fashionable new joint in Williamsburg with exposed brick walls and artfully-painted pipes and ductwork along the ceiling. They take a seat at a table near the back. The room is dimly but artfully lit, offering up a faintly conspiratorial atmosphere for the upwardly mobile patrons enjoying the early Spring afternoon. 



The first magician orders the latest, hippest craft beer-- a winter wheat number with a ginger infusion-- and the other orders a black coffee. The jukebox is especially loud and obnoxious in this joint, but at least the music is good; a carefully curated selection of vintage 60s rock and 70s soul. 

The magicians are old friends, but have gone in very different directions in recent years.


"So I wanted to touch base with you and see how your work has been progressing," the first says, carefully sipping from his wheat beer, carefully dabbing at the foam on hip lips with a cloth napkin. "I've been making some major strides with my own practices."


The other magician eyes his companion, careful not to betray a hint of judgment. "Really," he says neutrally, "what kind of strides are those?"


"I'm working with some people I met on Facebook. They're working in a number of different modalities and doing some exciting things," the first magician replies cheerily.


"What kind of modalities are those?," the other magician says, sipping at his coffee, trying to disguise his growing skepticism. It is very good coffee and he's grateful to have something to focus his attention on.


"Well, the dominant praxis is based in the Obeah tradition, but we're working in a number of different indigenous modalities and finding points of congruence among them," the first magician says, drumming his fingers on the table, somewhat arthymically, to an early Funkadelic number. "I'm considering becoming a priest in a Hoodoo coven operating out of Portland, which also incorporates Alexandrian and Chaos magic, as well as some Dianic and Tantric practices. I may have to leave the Golden Dawn order I'm involved with, though. It's considered an expression of vestigial imperialism in certain circles. It is, when you think about it. All of its rituals are based in Medieval European monarchial rites. But the Order is falling apart anyway."


"I see," the other answers, stirring his coffee, even though he takes it black. Staring hard at his cup, he asks his friend, "And you don't find that problematic at all?" A 'hoodoo coven.' Jesus. And how do you join a coven in Portland when you live in Park Slope?


"What do you mean?," his friend replies, with more than a slight hint of indignation.


"Can traditions be divorced from the cultures that birthed them? Can you just take bits and pieces at will like that? Isn't this just consumerism run amok?"


"What are you talking about?," the first magician says. "That's the way magic has always worked. Religion, culture, everything."


"What I'm trying to say is that you grew up eating Cheerios and watching He-Man and Transformers in the suburbs, not on a Haitian sugar plantation," the second magician replies,  "I know where your parents live, their house would have been considered a lavish castle in the Antebellum South. Don't you think you're engaging in…. cultural appropriation by assuming that Hoodoo or Obeah is yours for the taking? What dues have you paid to justify reinventing yourself as a Hoodoo man?"

"Listen, as a victim of late-stage capitalism I-- we-- are all paying some heavy dues, especially with the current occupant of the White House," his tablemate replies, despite the fact that he is pulling in a low six-figure salary as a systems analyst. "We have been robbed of our own ancient traditions. The patriarchal Abrahamic religions wiped out the indigenous faith of my Celtic forebears. I consider it an act of resistance to submit myself to a system that was birthed by the marginalized and the oppressed." 


He took another sip of his wheat beer and practiced his hard look, stung by the insinuation that he'd stoop to something as offensive as culto-spiritual appropriation. Theft, in other words. No better than a 18th Century slave trader.


The second magician decides to let it pass."What kind of results are you seeing," he asks instead, trying to re-steer the dialogue.


"Results?," his friend replies.


"Yes, what kind of results are you getting from the work? Are you keeping a journal?"


"Sure. But this isn't like rubbing a magic lamp and asking a djinn for three wishes or something. This is about exploration, self-discovery, self-actualization. We're not doing this to make withdrawals from the spirit-world ATM."


"OK," the second magician says. Since when wasn't magic about results? New Age therapeutic happytalk was everywhere now.


A waiter approaches to ask if they want to order anything from the kitchen. The first magician orders zucchini sticks, his companion orders buffalo wings. The arrival was well-timed since it broke the tension building between the two friends.


"So what kind of blood sacrifices are you partaking in?," the second magician inquires and immediately regrets the slip, which immediately kickstarts the aggro again.


"Is that some kind of joke?", the first magician replies, angrily. "We take it as a vow to do no harm to any sentient creature. I'm a practicing vegan now. Most of us are. I've had a lot of requests for curses, y'know, binding spells, even love spells. But we don't work that way."


"These traditions you're working with take animal sacrifice for granted. They have for a very long time. It's the currency of the spirit world. Hell, even Greek housewives brought sacrificial piglets and lambs to Mystery cults as the price of admission. At one time or other, every religion in the known world practiced blood sacrifice. It was the basis of temple worship in Judaism, all over the Mediterranean. Those Celtic forebears of yours didn't blink at human sacrifice. It was the foundation of their belief system. Same goes with the Norse. Same goes for the Phoenicians, the Canaanites, Mesoamericans. I mean, why should these spirits or the gods grant you favors if you aren't willing to give them something in return?"


"You sound like you're on a dangerous path, my friend," the first magician says, and begins scanning the room for a familiar face so he could escape this conversation.


"Me? No. I'm not the one claiming to rewrite ancient traditions to suit my needs. Animal sacrifice is not an opt-out in those traditions, it's part of the code. Always has been. Civil rights battles have been fought in court over preserving these practices. But here's the deal; if you're not willing to make some kind of meaningful sacrifice to the these spirits, who've been expecting them for thousands of years, then at some point sacrifices will be made for you. And I guarantee that you won't like that."


An uncomfortable silence takes hold. Both magicians stare hard at their cups.


"I don't know where all this is coming from," the first magician says, still studying the foam in his beer. "I was really looking forward to a meeting of the minds with you today."


"It's coming from concern for your safety and well-being," his friend replies, "Folk magic is not a hobby, it's not the latest boho fad. You and your friends are dabbling in systems that can't just be rewritten to suit the needs of postindustrial urban professionals. It's not a steam table at a buffet restaurant. These are not systems you can curate. You're dealing with the premodern, not the postmodern."


"What does that even mean?", the first magician asks. 


"It means that things have rules for a reason. And these are systems that based in deal-making with spirits who don't really give a shit whether you live or die. Just whether or not you can be useful to them."


"You're being seriously overly dramatic," the first magician says,  "I know people who've been working with these systems for years and haven't experienced anything like that."


"Haven't they? Maybe they just haven't made the connection. The spirits don't usually send you emails when they decide to fuck up your shit. Well, if you know their language you'll most certainly get the message. But first you need to let go of the illusion that the Universe is constantly conspiring on your behalf."


The first magician scoffs and begins scanning the room again.


"Listen, if you want to pursue all this, I can't stop you," the second magician says,  "All I can say is that you can't separate blood and sacrifice from religions that have been working around blood and sacrifice for millennia. You can certainly try but at some point, blood and sacrifice will come into your life whether you want it to or not. You might be a vegan but these spirits are most certainly carnivores."


"What happened to you, man?," the first magician asks, testily, "You sound like some friggin' church lady." 


"No, I sound like a magician."


82 comments:

  1. Do no harm. Chris, where are you in this discussion? Perhaps a Buddhist perspective can solve the insanity of blood libel. Loving kindness is the path we all need to enjoy. Mindfulness that dualism is whack. There is a path that resolves many insanities. Compassion is key. Shine forth by day. 87

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    1. I'm the guy at the next table, overhearing the conversation and biting my tongue. I want to say you don't get involved with hungry spirits in the first place but it's not my business...

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  2. This had me pissing myself! Good to know I'm not the only one who likes a plate of buffalo wings!

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    1. Only a magician would have them with coffee though...

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  3. Seems like there's no better time to point out that the only sacrifices required by Kek are dank memes and shitposts. And he does, indeed, exchange results for lulz - sometimes in truly spectacular quantities.

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    1. The only sacrifices required so far, I think you mean.

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    2. I suppose that's true. There are depictions of Kek where he's engaged in ultraviolence against politicos, liberals, and other *chan enemies, though I'm not sure to what extent he could play a role as a war god. I do think it's perfectly conceivable that a god might be willing to grant boons in exchange for a good laugh - things just aren't the same when you're not fucking with the human world, after all. One guy did a sacrifices of tendies and it was generally agreed that this is permitted without being required. *chan folklore indicates that Ammit, who through a roundabout way has become our goddess of JUSTICE, is fond of sacrifices of exotic fruits.

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  4. I love every minute of this. It may be the most delightful thing you've ever written.

    "I'm a pagan reconstructionist, following an authentically ancient tradition. That's why I'm a vegan who takes all his beliefs from documents compiled in the last 50 years by academics who hate me, ignoring only the bits that would conflict with my bourgeois lifestyle. I sneer with contempt at the older traditions of Western magic, derived as they are from Masonic traditions that pre-date the founding of my country. Have I mentioned that I'm a Democrat? All magicians are."

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    1. Well, there were vegetarian "pagans".
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_vegetarianism#Greece

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    2. Yes, but when was the last time you ran across a Pythagorean Reconstructionist?

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    3. There's a world of difference between mere paganism and intercourse with the spirit world, as you all surely know. You can use grape juice for communion but is that really part of the original recipe?

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  5. Good observations. What you pointed out above, esp. the hypocrisy, is a big part of why I'm not involved with such things. Maybe I'm a bit too much of a stereotypical X-er, but I'm not now & never really was a "joiner" by nature. Same goes with politics, I don't have any party affiliation. I even found anarchism smothering in its own way. I know what works for me as far as belief systems go but at the same time I know my beliefs aren't for everyone & that everyone else's beliefs usually aren't for me. Plus I'm always re-evaluating what I know in light of what I learn, can't take anything at face value or accept that anyone has "all" the answers, esp. now.

    "Blood and sacrifice will come into your life whether you want it to or not." So very very true. Good advice that.

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    1. Fellow GenXers unite! Or don't!

      I'm with you as far as the joining goes, David.

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    2. We folks that study esoterica (humanity, consciousness, reality - or at least its perception) but aren't inclined to join any groups - we could form an alliance of our like minded fellow travelers...hmm...oh wait...

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  6. I will +1 this, and I don't do that lightly.

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  7. Hi Chris,

    That was a great framework to explain some aspects of magical practice that should probably be seriously considered before anyone embarks on a dabble or three into it, or in case of the first magician, choosing what he thinks fits into his fashionable little box.

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    1. Sometimes you have no choice, though. Sometimes the spirits or the gods force themselves into your life and rip everything to bits without you.

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  8. Thank you Chris!! This is what NEEDS to be said!! (raises toast)

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  9. And speaking of magic...I was wondering if you might be addressing some of what I have been hearing about this Aleksandr Dugin character, lately? Specifically, what he means to American politics and Russian cultural spirituality.

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    1. Branko Malic of Kali Tribune has been writing on occult aspects of Duginism: http://en.kalitribune.com/tag/alexander-dugin/

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    2. I don't really have an opinion on Dugin at the moment. There's so much hysterical nonsense about Russia being shoved down our throats it's going to take some time before we can really evaluate him.

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    3. Dugin is a fascinating guy, fluent enough in English to have a number of interviews available on Youtube.
      Pan-Eurasianism vs Atlanticism, what he calls the Anglo dominated Western world order.
      In other words he favors a type of multi polar patchwork of states each following their own ethnocultural path vs the Western "invade the world, invite the world" consumerist paradigm.
      He rounds it all off with a dash of Tsarist Third Rome triumphalism.
      Food for thought.
      By the way... excellent post.

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    4. I have seen some of the videos and been reading up on some articles already. I haven't formed an opinion just yet about him, either, but find his Rasputin-like emergence onto the scene a bit too melodramatic, as if this was apart of a script where we get introduced to a new character in mid-season.

      Chris usually has such laser precision in pattern recognition for these kinds of events, so that is why I was asking him to see if he had any observations to share in coming posts. The excellence you noted in his posts are due, in my opinion, to his ability to find the other threads that can get missed and then tie them back to his diorama of connections.

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    5. Here's an interesting piece on Dugin by Dr. Bones.

      http://disinfo.com/2017/03/mystic-shaping-russias-future-bringing-back-dark-ages/

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    6. Another brilliant piece Chris.
      I am just starting to get into the anscestral spirit side of things per Gordon's suggestion. Am realizing there is a lot there.
      The thing was, I was so put off by my early Catholic upbringing that I shunned it all, never knowing, until recently, that there was much there that might be helpful.
      It also didn't hurt that I had my ontological map basically redrawn after working with ayahuasca for a bit.
      Love the conversation here.
      Cheers

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    7. Thank you, Juan. Feel free to share the results from your work whenever you like.

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    8. Bill, we're going through a period of outright memetic and informational warfare, of a kind I don't recall ever seeing. So it's hard for me to look at someone like Dugin since it's always filtered through a highly ideological lens of some sort. I've read a number of articles on him but my present opinion is that he's being puffed by oppositional parties to further this new Cold War agenda. That opinion is certainly subject to change but I can only weigh it against similar efforts to make scare figures out of marginal players.

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    9. And speaking of Cold War agendas: This all feels to me very much like it did in the early 80's, especially since the recent Syrian news and the shake-leg posturing between the powers that be.

      Here we go again?......

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  10. I liked that.

    Actually, it goes to prove that coming from a Catholic country isn't a liability at all, as magicians coming from Protestant backgrounds seem to assume. The Catholic church keeps banging on the Last Supper and "This bread is my body, this wine is my blood".

    But people, there's no need for vegetarians to freak out. Or even for teetotalers. Pomegranate juice will do just fine as symbolic blood, and it has a tradition going back to ancient Egypt.

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    1. Pomegranates are part of the Persephone story as well, aren't they? And Catholicism- the old-fashioned kind- is loaded to the gills with all kinds of delicious pagan goodies. We can thank those wise old popes for the syncretism.

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    2. As a lapsed Catholic with 12 years of Catholic school under my belt I can attest to the latent power of various Catholic traditions. Marian worship comes to mind, particularly the Black Madonna.
      I still have fond memories of Benediction in an old, cavernous church with waves of frankincense wafting through the aisles. It felt very ancient to me as a child.

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  11. Fundamental rule of Reality:
    TAANSTAFL?

    Fun bit of Microficton there

    Is there a reason why Monarchies last longer than Democracies?

    I chanced across energy work completely by accident and then stopped when I heard tales from fellow practitioners who got hurt by beings or fauna "out there"

    (maybe the Biblical admonitions against magic n astrology n spirits etc is there for a reason? Hmm)

    Just some thoughts knocked loose

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    1. Except that there's blood sacrifice and "magic" in the bible.

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    2. Magic is other people's religion, I suppose.

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    3. @decades: *chuckle* just an observation in the sense of smart and observant human beings could make when, say, living amongst wild animals to learn how to hunt. Perhaps this hunting is so dangerous that learning to hunt without having a proper teacher can cause terrible trouble, so, admonitions against hunting (to prevent unskilled hunting). No actual occultists were hurt during this riff. Tho some were savagely poodled.

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  12. This post isn't a prelude to the 'American Gods' TV series, is it?-)
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1898069/?pf_rd_m=A2FGELUUNOQJNL&pf_rd_p=2952930802&pf_rd_r=0M5CRQM1RKA6QM54PC6Y&pf_rd_s=right-3&pf_rd_t=15021&pf_rd_i=tt0080360&ref_=tt_pks_april17_rhs_lk1

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    1. No, but thank you for the reminder, Darren.

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  13. Your pets, your cats and dogs, will love and adore you right up to the moment you have that heart attack and die on the kitchen floor. Then, about three days later, when no one has found you and no one has been putting out the Meow Mix, they will start eating your face. The Interwebs are full of pictures of such events, go ahead and browse.

    Now, imagine you're worshiping a cat god. Domesticated as long as you pay attention to its needs. But stop feeding it, then hang around a while, ignoring it as it screeches for sustenance, trapped in the house with you. How long until the claws come out? How long until those sunrise kisses in bed become shredding bites?

    Gods. Can't live with 'em, can't live without 'em.

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  14. "What are you talking about?," the first magician says. "That's the way magic has always worked. Religion, culture, everything."

    I note that the second magician didn't disprove this point, except by attempting Ad Hominem.

    If a Japanese physicist makes a new discovery, will you discount it because it's cultural appropriation of Japanese physics?

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    1. I think, viewing this exchange from a 3rd person pov, that the second does not actually see it as cultural appropriation, but rather is pointing out the absurdity of it as it exists within the firsts own constructs while making a point that one cannot always pick and choose things in magic (or life) as if one is at a buffet.

      Just my take though.

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    2. This is a dialectic between opposing schools of magic. Which side you take is down to how you view the work. But just remember the spirits you invoke also get to throw their two cents in as well.

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    3. For sure. I found it an interesting read. I actually have more background in these philosophies than I generally let on, and have my own ideas about it. But, I think meme magic is winning no matter. It fits the modern cultural medium after all. It is the magic of the modern rabble, and sometimes the dark machinations of the suburban technocrat.

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  15. Magic is absolutely fascinating and wonderful, the only problem is that 99% of it doesn't work.

    Which is not to say that SCIENCE! has a 100% success rate either. It just has a lower than 99% failure rate. Otherwise no one would have swapped to it.

    The "real" magic I have personally seen or done seems very much bound by clear rules, even when it's "wild" or "chaos" or other modern childish label style magic.

    Definitely, rules exist for "magic" as with all other cosmic forces be they electromagnetism or cartoons.

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    1. Have you practiced every different type of magic, and had success on only one try out of a hundred?

      People didn't "switch to" "Science" from "Magic." Magic and Science are different tools, applied to entirely different ends. And it can be argued that magic is, in fact, ubiquitous in contemporary industrial culture. Your source here is Ioan Culianu's "Eros and Magic in the Renaissance," which points out that modern public relations, propaganda and advertising techniques are functionally identical to the magic of Renaissance figures such as Giordano Bruno (recently resurrected as a martyr of "Science").

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    2. Magic "doesn't work" if you look at in the context of immediate cause and effect, of dropping a few quarters in the magic vending machine and expecting magic candy to pop out. You're dealing with forces that regard time in a completely different way than we do. So maybe for many- maybe most- people, no effect or result will be noticed. At least not right away. But I think the element surprise is an undervalued aspect of the process that many magicians themselves might fail to recognize.

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  16. Postmodern humanism fails to grasp the nature of man, that it has a dark side. Failure to recognize ones own dark nature only empowers it.

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    1. Jung couldn't have said it better himself. Well, maybe he could but he'd be a lot less succinct.

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  17. Magic by non-magicians is the Isis cult's insatiable demand.

    http://www.lyndonlarouche.org/larouche-obama-mead.pdf

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    1. Wow, LaRouche just throws it all into the blender, doesn't he?

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    2. It's like a mimeographed SecretSun on steroids ...

      But to the point, the bigger the beast gets the more it needs to eat. Think of this in relation to the mass rituals the population as a whole is subjected to more and more. The overhead is too steep to rely on rich and connected occultists or wayward suburban teens. Now, it's an open-invitation en masse with no cover charge. There is a one-drink minimum, however, and I hear the bar is not cheap.

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  18. yeah we finally found our prophet, but don' t get a head of yourself guy.

    ;)

    Now, produce MORE!!!

    The interlink commands it!!!

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    1. I hope you don't mean me. I read the prophetic books- anyone who has wouldn't want the job. But I appreciate the gesture nonetheless.

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  19. So many would-be wizards are making the classic mistake that John Constantine warns against, seeking something for nothing. In my comment to your post I compared the gods to barely-contained animals, for that's what they are. Elemental forces in drag, wearing masks. People think they can reason with them, and then they delude themselves into thinking they can bargain, or even flim-flam them. Amazing.

    This is why I think Gordon White et al. are on the right track with the ancestor veneration. You have a cadre of intermediaries on the Other Side who more-or-less like you, and who know the territory. They're vetting you , and your requests, determining what is possible and acting in your best interests. You asked for something, and they didn't respond? Maybe they're saving you from a big bucket of grief. Maybe you asked for the wrong toys. That kind of thing. Go pour out a 40 on their grave and thank them for watching your back, saving you from the crazy ones.

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    1. Very wise words. Words we'd all be well advised to consider...

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    2. As opposed to his sepll to go to a quiet crossroad and make a deal with Lucifer. All you need to offer is "food, alcohol, praise, artwork dedicated to the spirit, and so on." Certainly not anything more. Lucifer is basically an easily pleased entity. I suspect if you make a deal with the devil he asks for a bit more than that. Yup, sound advice.

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    3. I'm not sure there's any good evidence that Lucifer is an easily pleased entity. Isn't there a body of lore that tells us that spirits are notorious impostors? From the Apostle Paul to John Keel there are all kinds of admonitions against taking spirits at their word, isn't there?

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    4. Great idea, ancestor veneration. The Tibetans call this idea Drala. One can be adopted if one wants -- by anybody's Drala. Then you vie with the gods. If they like you, success. Even if they don't, if you survive that is success -- being tough enough (and virtuous enough) to earn their grudging respect.

      I suppose the Gods could be elementals. After all, they feed on the elements the same as we do -- just more subtly. So subtly some of them might claim they don't -- saying it is only for the taste or the pleasure, the way people lie about their libations. But still, in a Vedic sense at least, they need our oblations. Otherwise their place at the top of the elemental food chain would be a broken link, a cul-de-sac like that Talking Heads song 'Heaven'.

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  20. In Christianity you dont need to sacrifice things anymore because jesus already sacrificed himself for the world

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    1. What a demagogue, Really? The penultimate fairy tale. 87

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  21. Just read Moses' comment, and honestly, I thought you were aiming at Gordon a bit with this piece, Chris (which surprised me, because I know you guys are tight.

    Not sure if you're a premium member of Rune Soup, but I am, and he definitely is all over invoking spirits - but also talks about how magic will 'ruin your life' (quote!)... yet talks about sigils being free.

    What do you think, Chris? I haven't jumped in with both feet because, well, in 5th grade my flute teacher's wife gave me "The Exorcist" to read, and I'm still terrified.

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    1. Aimed at Gordon? Why would you think that?

      Absolutely not aimed at Gordon. He's the antithesis of the first magician in very many ways.

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    2. Yes, why would anyone think that?

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    3. I also do not see this blog entry as anything directed at Gordon. But, as a Premium member of his site, go ahead and ask him about it in his weekly Q&A. He reads the Sun as well, and he'll definitely have comments about the two magicians (aside from the fact that they should be having a Whiskey Rant, and that "The Two Magicians" is a classic English folk tune).

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  22. Personally as i have delved into the occult over the years, i have noticed most left wing people are materlists by nature. The left are the subversive, against tradition, against the past, against ceremony.
    They are people of the future, people of science.
    A thing obama liked to talk about was the "arc of progress", these people worship progress, they think its a straight line, i think its a squiggly line.
    Nietzsche said that left wing people have a slave morality.

    " Biblical principles of turning the other cheek, humility, charity, and pity are the result of universalizing the plight of the slave onto all humankind, and thus enslaving the masters as well. "The democratic movement is the heir to Christianity."[5]—the political manifestation of slave morality because of its obsession with freedom and equality."

    It may sound controversial in the politically correct world, (by the way political correctness is just a tool liberals use to feel better about themselves without having to solve any problems), but i feel that spirituality and magic is best practiced when its of your ancestors.


    The only leftist occultist i know of and respect is alan moore.

    For the most part they seem to drift into new age, wicca.

    oh, or the hippy type who would fall for every indian guru looking to make some cash and bang some chicks.

    I never got that, have they read the kali yuga. Everyone turns into a liberal asshole, then god comes down to kill them all. ha

    Maybe our politics shape our views on how to practice religion.

    Im not anti science, im for every way to explore this world.

    I think most peoples views on religion and spirituality have been shaped by the abarhamic religions.
    I like alan moores view on it, he said in a video that these religions have middle men like priests, or rabbis, or imams. They speak to god for you. This has made humanity more distant from god.
    Real anarchist view of religion there.


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    1. I don't think left and right have any real meaning anymore. As Gordon says the real conflict will be between centralization and decentralization, control and autonomy. As for science, it's morphing into a religion at the exact same time revelations are surfacing as to just how corrupt and unreliable most science being done today actually is. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-39054778

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    2. TSS,

      I enjoyed Paul Feyerabend's investigations which seemed to result in that despite the fact that there really wasn't one method for science that everyone used, it still worked.

      The usage of the term science that I like using is the careful and collectively gathered knowledge of the human race. That way magic and spirits and spherical cows of physics are science.

      Somewhere between the extremes of Science is the Answer to Everything (when we really know its 42) and nothing that humans do is worth it or even competent (which is where things like postmodernism tends to end up).

      We human beings achieve 'miracles'...they are so commonplace now that they are in the background. Like the Mars rovers. US conquering hunget in its citizens. Life expectancy. So much that isn't reported by media because it isn't negative.

      Or something like that.

      (Heard a cool thing the other day aboot a guy remote viewing into a particle beam...very trippy...this technique could be used for so much...helping out archeology n cosmology perhaps?)

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    3. I took the time to read the story you linked, there. Hilariously,

      "The reproducibility difficulties are not about fraud, according to Dame Ottoline Leyser, director of the Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge.
      That would be relatively easy to stamp out. Instead, she says: "It's about a culture that promotes impact over substance, flashy findings over the dull, confirmatory work that most of science is about."
      She says it's about the funding bodies that want to secure the biggest bang for their bucks, the peer review journals that vie to publish the most exciting breakthroughs, the institutes and universities that measure success in grants won and papers published and the ambition of the researchers themselves."

      In other words, it's about fraud. Fudging, cooking, "top-drawer" behavior, the kind of two-faced misrepresentation the'skeptics' accuse parapsychologists of, in order to get ahead. And even if it's institutionalized, it's still fraud. People want to believe in the miraculous power of scientific research so badly... Because we're wandering in this parched materialistic desert. And while the demons and the deities may crave blood, it's scientific knowledge and technology that has agreed Rivers of blood... Kinda makes you wonder.

      What an age we live in. Still... The universe appears to be more and more magical the longer we look at it, no? ,

      Delete
  23. Kim Love, what left are you talking about? Sounds sketchy, removed from the left I know. Where's the Love, Love? 87

    ReplyDelete
  24. Speaking of sketchy, a possible warning of what happens when magicians don't do their homework:

    https://vigilantcitizen.com/latestnews/brazilian-student-disappears-leaves-behind-room-covered-occult-symbols-coded-texts/

    Anyone hear more about this? It caught my attention because I just started reading DeLonge/Levenda's "Gods, Man & War" (Sekret Machines) & boy did it resonate.

    Quote:

    "Bruno Borges, a 24-year-old student from Brazil, reportedly vanished on March 27th after completing a secretive project consisting of thousands of pages of encrypted texts combined with mysterious symbols. Along with references to the Bible, alchemy, demonology and Leonardo da Vinci, Borges left a bizarre painting of him with an alien – prompting some people to conclude that he was … abducted by aliens."

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    1. This is a very strange story. I hope this kid is all right. I don't get a very good feeling from it though. It usually doesn't end well when people go missing like that these days.

      Delete
    2. C'mon, a guy named "Bruno Borges" disappears leaving behind a mysterious cache of books written in secret codes? This is clearly someone's art project.

      Delete
    3. i agree,I got the same impression from looking at the pictures; the room looks like an installation piece.

      Delete
  25. Medicine Men had years of training. If they didn't, their own family could die. Be careful out there.

    ReplyDelete
  26. A fellow Canadian Jordan Peterson
    "You don't get to choose to not pay a price"
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ug8Dcz3kyOA

    ReplyDelete
  27. @Kim Love writes: "In Christianity you don't need to sacrifice things anymore because jesus already sacrificed himself for the world."

    Using the Belief System promoted by this blog, that could fit. Some spirits (Neighbours?) have different levels of experience, agency, power, age...so yeah there could be an ancient spirit who can negate or control other spirits abilities etc.

    Certainly fun to riff on

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  28. Kind of sounded like it could be a conversation between two alphabet agencies.

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  29. A classic book on the Occult and Magik is James H. Neal's Ju-ju in My Life, I assume long out of print. Neal was an ex-pat Brit in 1950s or 60s British Ghana, initially skeptical of this talk of 'African ju-ju Magic', as most Westerners are. His experiences there taught him otherwise, along with plenty other expats. His book is a true classic, startling even by the standards of those who think we have heard it all.

    The thing is - and why I mention it here - African Ju-ju is anything but touchy-feely sentimental slush Magik. It is routinely and willfully murderous, a deadly art. Ju-ju took the Hex Death - and its shamanic/occult counter-jamming so to speak - to its limits. Not for the fainthearted and cappuccino magicians.

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    Replies
    1. I'm kind of sick of this type of response.

      What I've never felt the need to say in re: to anyone harboring bigoted mentalities- I now do.


      Chris- the use of Hoodoo in your writing seemed to really over emphasize its cartoonish definition.

      Hoodoo is practical much less theist and doesn't really fit with the rest of your talk on the dark dark ways of black people's religo- magick.
      Hoodoo is modern synthesis of the practical activities related to indigenous magicks.

      Also, like any gnostic may mention, blood sacrifice seems to run thru many of these traditions...just because aliens come to suck up the sadmatter from blood Energy doesn't mean the tradition is based around such a hijacking.


      You think a Haitian kid learns to go kill a person or pig in order to gain something materiallistically?

      Or is the child more likely to be a part of a family who offered up a chicken to the archetype of healing, before cooking it and feeding an entire family?


      The lust for blood IS barbaric and a confusion for all involved... still didn't need to assert the same old out of date definitions and examples.


      Delete
  30. I don't think I've ever read anything that explains the connection between the spirit world, magic and religion as well as this, thank you. Well we do have Harvest Festival I guess that counts towards something.
    I had a dream recently where a large purple, plasma type of light ball spoke to me saying 'The system is God'' rather spooky but actually quite amusing.

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    Replies
    1. More spooky and thought provoking than amusing.

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